What Companies are Doing for Holiday Parties During Pandemic

Christmas party Pandemic

One of the hallmarks of the holiday season is the company Christmas party, but with the COVID-19 pandemic in hyperdrive, many companies are rethinking their plans.

A number of businesses have cancelled their parties altogether, but other managers feel that in light of this very difficult year for many people, a company Christmas party might be just what employees need to lift their spirits for a while.

On the other hand, with the Centers for Disease Control even recommending that people not get together for family celebrations like Thanksgiving and Christmas, an office party would completely go against those recommendations.

Also, you could face liability and potential legal action if you do hold an in-person party and members of your staff come down with COVID-19.

Instead of in-person events, many companies are planning Zoom teleconference “parties” and they are asking their workers to join in by getting dressed up and bringing their favorite beverages and snacks to the online do.

According to Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc., 55% of human resources professionals surveyed said their company is not having a holiday celebration this year, which is the highest number since the consulting firm started surveying employers about their holiday plans.

Here’s what the survey found:

  • 45% of HR professionals said their company had cancelled holiday party plans due to the pandemic.
  • 3% said cost-cutting was the reason for cancelling their party.
  • 4% said they never host holiday parties.
  • 23% said they were unsure of holiday plans and were awaiting state and local guidance before deciding.

“It is no surprise that many companies are forgoing the holiday party this year,” said Andrew Challenger, senior vice president of Challenger, Gray & Christmas. “It’s difficult to celebrate and implement all the precautions needed to keep everyone safe. The last thing any employer wants is an outbreak due to their year-end party.”

Additionally, the survey found that 55% of respondents continue keeping most of their staff working from home and another 5.5% have all of their employees telecommuting.

When asked when employers plan to bring all workers back to the office, 44% were unsure or did not answer. Another 21% planned to bring all workers back in early 2021, and 8% will wait for a vaccine.

Precautions for an in-person event

The companies that said they would be holding in-person holiday events plan to take steps to reduce the chances of COVID-19 spreading among their workers by taking the following precautions:

  • Requiring social distancing while at the party.
  • Requiring all attendees to wear masks.
  • Providing hand sanitizers, alcohol wipes and face masks.
  • Taking temperatures of all workers when they arrive.
  • Limiting the number of employees at the party.
  • Holding the event in a large area where employees can socially distance from one another (venues should be well-ventilated with several doors and windows).
  • Keeping hand sanitizer in various locations around the office.
  • Hosting outdoor events.
  • Regularly checking the CDC’s website to be up to date on precautions and advice.
  • Keeping up on state and local guidelines to get more accurate information on current case levels in their area.

Other options

Some companies that plan to skip festivities this year have come up with other ways to celebrate and reward their employees during the holidays, including:

  • Organizing virtual gift exchanges or virtual Secret Santa exchanges.
  • Giving away cooking classes or gifts like Apple Airpods or other small electronics (the cost per person will often be less than if you held an actual party and paid for the facility, catering, decorations, entertainment and drinks).
  • Assembling care packages with baked goods or gift certificates and delivering them to employees’ doorsteps.

 

Daunting Emergency COVID-19 Workplace Safety Rules on Tap

Workplace safety

The Cal/OSHA Standards Board is set to vote on new emergency regulations that will impose strict rules on employers to implement safeguards in order to reduce the risk of COVID-19 spreading in the workplace.

The board on Nov. 19 will vote on the sweeping proposal that extends the reach of protections to employer-provided housing and transportation, as well as imposing new reporting requirements on employers who have workers that contract the coronavirus.

The board is expected to approve the new regulations and they could take effect Nov. 30. Employers will therefore need to ramp up quickly to comply with the new rules.

Here are the highlights of the emergency regulations:

  • Physical distancing and mask-wearing are required unless it is not possible to wear masks on the job. If physical distancing is not possible in the workplace, the employer would have to explain why not.
  • Employers must provide face coverings and ensure they are worn by employees over the nose and mouth.
  • At fixed work locations where it is not possible to maintain physical distancing, the employer shall install cleanable partitions that effectively reduce aerosol transmission between employees.
  • Employers must implement cleaning and disinfecting procedures for frequently touched surfaces and objects, such as doorknobs, elevator buttons, equipment, tools, handrails, handles, controls, bathroom surfaces, and steering wheels.
  • Employers will be required to have a written COVID-19 prevention program. Cal/OSHA will allow the program to be incorporated into an organization’s existing injury and illness prevention plan or be stand-alone.
  • Employers must identify and evaluate COVID-19 hazards with participation from employees, and then correct those hazards.
  • Employers must investigate coronavirus cases among their employees. If they discover one of their staff has contracted COVID-19, they will be required to notify all employees or their authorized representatives, independent contractors, or employees at a worksite who might have been exposed, within one day. Workers who may have been exposed must be offered COVID-19 testing at no cost.
  • Employers must report coronavirus cases in their workplaces to local health authorities.
  • Employers must maintain medical records related to COVID-19 and provide those records to the local health department, the California Department of Public Health, Cal/OSHA, and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (upon request).
  • Employers must implement a system of record-keeping to track all COVID-19 cases in the workplace.
  • Employees with COVID-19 symptoms may not return to work until at least 10 days since symptoms first appeared, and not until after 24 hours have passed since the employee had a fever of 100.4 or higher and after all symptoms have passed.

There are even rules for disinfecting and cleaning employee housing and transportation if the company provides them.

The regs also include provisions that are beyond the scope of workplace safety regulations, such as requiring employers to maintain employees’ earnings, seniority and benefits when they are off work because of COVID-19.

Key takeaways

You can find the full proposed emergency regulation here.

With this regulation expected to be approved, California employers may only have until Nov. 30 until the new rules take effect. During that time, companies should:

  • Prepare for new record-keeping requirements,
  • Start writing their COVID-19 prevention programs,
  • Consider implementing testing protocols as per the regulations, and
  • Prepare policies and procedures for notifying affected staff and others of possible COVID-19 exposure.

California’s COVID-19 Tracking Requirement Challenges Employers

COVID-19 tracking

SB 1159, signed into law in September, requires that when a California employer “knows or reasonably should know” that an employee has tested positive for coronavirus, it must report that positive case to its workers’ compensation carrier within three business days.

There is a lot of ground to cover in these reports and the legislation was passed without much publicity, so many employers may not even know about their obligations. And that could cost them: the fine for non-compliance is $10,000 per incident.

The law goes further than merely reporting a positive case: The report must include a number of details that employment law experts say will place a significant reporting burden on employers:

  • The date the employee tested positive;
  • The address or addresses of the employee’s place or places of employment during the 14-day period preceding the positive test, and
  • The highest number of employees who reported to work in the 45 days preceding the last day the employee worked in the workplace.

The task will be made even more difficult if an employee works at multiple worksites, and an employer could have to spend a significant amount of time doing all that detective work.

Making the task even more difficult, California employers will have to go through the same process every time an employee catches COVID-19.

At its essence, the law creates a presumption that employees who suffer illness or death resulting from COVID-19 between July 6 this year and Jan. 1, 2023, contracted the virus at work, which makes them eligible for workers’ compensation benefits. If a worker dies, their dependents will be eligible for workers’ compensation death benefits that range from $250,000 to $320,000 depending on the number of dependents.

The presumption applies to all employees:

(1) who test positive during an outbreak at the employee’s specific place of employment; and (2) whose employer has five or more employees.

The term “injury” below includes illness or death resulting from COVID-19, and all of the following conditions must exist for the presumption to apply:

  • The employee tests positive for COVID-19 within 14 days after a day that they performed labor or services at their place of employment;
  • The date of injury shall be the last date the employee performed labor or services at the employee’s place of employment at the employer’s direction prior to the positive test.
  • The employee’s positive test occurred during a period of an outbreak at the employee’s specific place of employment.

What is an ‘outbreak’?

An “outbreak” exists if, within 14 calendar days, one of the following occurs at a specific place of employment:

  • If the employer has 100 employees or fewer at a specific place of employment, four employees test positive for COVID-19;
  • If the employer has more than 100 employees at a specific place of employment, 4% of the number of employees who reported to the specific place of employment test positive for COVID-19; or
  • A specific place of employment is ordered to close by a local public health department, the State Department of Public Health, the Division of Occupational Safety and Health, or a school superintendent due to a risk of infection with COVID-19.

The Takeaway: Be Prepared

The most important thing is that you are prepared for the paperwork and detective work you’ll have to engage in in case one of your workers’ contracts the coronavirus. You may want to put systems in place now so that gathering the information will be easier and you can set up an efficient system to get the information you’ll need in case of a COVID-19 infection at your workplace.

Injury and Illness Prevention Plans Save You Money, Period!

IIPP

Employees are your most valuable asset, but many businesses overlook the importance of having a workplace safety program in place to protect them.

Loss control is about employers caring for their workers’ safety. Successful loss control programs are means of reducing injuries and the severity of a potential accident.

If you want to reduce the costs and risks associated with workplace injuries and illnesses, you need to address safety and health right along with production. You should start by writing a plan and see that it is put into practice. Specifically, that means creating and implementing an Injury and Illness Prevention Program (IIPP).

The IIPP will identify what has to be done to promote the safety and health of your employees, and the safety of your worksite. Elements of your IIPP should include:

  • Assignment of responsibility
  • Communications
  • Compliance
  • Inspections
  • Investigations
  • Correcting unsafe conditions
  • Training
  • Recordkeeping.

Taking this approach to loss control will make the workplace safer, decrease workers’ compensation and overtime costs, reduce turnover rates, and minimize the risk of Occupational Safety and Health Administration fines — all of which in turn will increase productivity and profits.

Loss control starts with an authentic commitment from management. You should also ensure that supervisors, managers and employees are all on board and, together, the collaborative teams will achieve success.

Hazard assessment, evaluation, action-planning, problem-solving, implementation, record-keeping and documentation are the steps for a successful loss control plan.

Open communication is vital

Open communication with employees is important to facilitate a successful loss control program. Employee cooperation is connected to everyone understanding what the program is all about, why it is important to them and how it personally affects them.

Consider different channels via which your workforce can be informed, including meetings, e-mails, newsletters or text messages. Training is an important aspect of your program to ensure everyone has a good understanding of workplace safety.

Records are an important part of your safety plans. Records that should be maintained include:

  • Training
  • Employee injuries
  • Accident/injury investigations
  • Inspection records/corrective actions
  • OSHA 300 logs (where required)
  • Job analysis
  • Safety meetings
  • Equipment and vehicle inspections
  • CPR/first aid training
  • DMV driving records.

The takeaway

Remember to update and maintain all your programs at least once a year and/or if there are any changes.

If you are ready to make the commitment of reducing injuries and illnesses and managing claims, you can expect your costs to go down and your profits to go up.

Dealing with Violent Customers Who Refuse to Wear Masks

wearing a mask at work

As many states and municipalities have issued mandatory mask orders for businesses that are open to the public, operators like retailers and restaurants have been thrust into the front lines of reducing the spread of the virus by requiring customers to wear masks when on their premises.

This has led to confrontations that sometimes result in violence — and even in the deaths of some workers.

Due to the volatility of some of these confrontations, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued a guide for limiting workplace violence associated with COVID-19. The guidance recommends:

  • Offering customers options to minimize their contact with others and promote social distancing. These can include curbside pick-up; personal shoppers; home delivery for groceries, food and other services; and alternative shopping hours.
  • Posting signs that let customers know about policies for wearing masks, social distancing, and the maximum number of people allowed in a business facility.
  • Advertising COVID-19-related policies on your website.
  • Providing employee training on threat recognition, conflict resolution, non-violent response, and on any other relevant topics related to workplace violence response.
  • Putting in place steps to assess and respond to workplace violence. Response will depend on the severity of the violence and on the size and structure of the business. Possible responses may include reporting to a manager or supervisor on-duty, calling security or calling 911.
  • Remaining aware of and supporting employees and customers if a threatening or violent situation occurs.
  • Assigning two workers to work as a team to encourage COVID-19 prevention policies to be followed, if staffing permits.
  • Installing security systems (e.g., panic buttons, cameras, alarms) and training employees on how to use them.
  • Identifying a safe area for employees to go to if they feel they are in danger (e.g., a room that locks from the inside, has a second exit route, and has a phone or silent alarm).

Training on warning signs and response

Employee training on workplace violence typically covers definitions and types of violence, risk factors and warning signs for violence, prevention strategies, and ways to respond to threatening, potentially violent, or violent situations.

Warning signs — As part of training, employees often learn verbal and non-verbal cues that may be warning signs of possible violence. Verbal cues can include speaking loudly or swearing.

Non-verbal cues can include clenched fists, heavy breathing, a fixed stare and pacing. The more cues shown, the greater the risk of violence.

Response — During training, employees also learn how to appropriately respond to potentially violent or violent situations.

Responses range from paying attention to a person and maintaining non-threatening eye contact, to using supportive body language and avoiding threatening gestures, such as finger-pointing or crossed arms.

Consider implementing a “tap-out” system that allows an employee to make a signal for a supervisor or other employee to step in and the at-risk staff member to walk away.

Employee responsibilities guidelines

  1. Attend all employer-provided training on how to recognize, avoid and respond to potentially violent situations.
  2. Report perceived threats or acts of violence to your manager or supervisor, following any existing policies that may be in place.
  3. Remain aware of and support co-workers and customers if a threatening or violent situation occurs.
  4. Do not argue with a customer if they make threats or become violent. If needed, go to a safe area, (ideally, a room that locks from the inside, has a second exit route, and has a phone or silent alarm).
  5. Do not attempt to force anyone who appears upset or violent to follow COVID-19 prevention policies or other polices or practices related to COVID-19 (such as limits on the number of household or food products that can be bought).

Raft of Bills Would Add New COVID-19 Rules for Employers

workplace safety

The California Legislature is working on a number of new measures to protect workers in the state during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The measures take aim at “holes” in the system that may leave employees who contract the coronavirus on the job without workers’ compensation benefits, footing higher utility bills because of working at home and needing sick leave time available to them should they contract the disease.

Gov. Gavin Newsom said he would work closely with legislators to help the measures become law.

Below we look at the legislative moves that have gained the most traction and are supported by the governor.

Workers’ compensation

There are two bills (one in the Assembly and the other in the State Senate) that would make it easier for employees to be paid workers’ compensation if they contract COVID-19 (presumably on the job).

Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez (D-San Diego) has introduced AB 196, which would create a presumption that essential workers who contract COVID-19 were infected while on the job and that the employer would not be able to contest the claim.

Meanwhile, Sen. Jerry Hill (D-San Mateo) has introduced SB 1159, which would require workers’ compensation coverage for COVID-19-related illness or death for employees who contract the virus. The infected employee would not have to prove they had contracted the coronavirus on the job, and would require the employer, if contesting the claim, to prove that it hadn’t been.

The law essentially codifies an executive order made by Newsom in May, but it does not cover new worker claims made on or after July 5.

Both bills are a work in progress and may eventually be merged into one. Hill is talking to labor and business groups about his measure, and which industries would be covered and whether the provisions would be retroactive.

Job-protected leave

Assemblyman Ash Kalra (D-San Jose) has introduced AB 3216, which would prohibit employers from refusing a request for up to 12 weeks of job-protected leave so that a worker can care for a child whose school has been forced to close due to a health emergency declared by a local, state or federal authority.

Easing meal and rest break rules

AB 1492 would allow employees more flexibility in when they can take meal and rest breaks when working from home. The measure by Assemblywoman Tasha Boerner Horvath (D-Encinitas) would also require employers to pay staff who skip those breaks for an extra hour of work.

Employers would also be required to pay for additional equipment and a portion of the workers’ internet and utility bills when working from home. This is because it has been reported that many people who have been forced to work from home are seeing higher usage bills.

Reporting workplace outbreaks

AB 685, authored by Eloise Reyes (D-Colton), would require employers to notify their employees, the Division of Occupational Safety and Health, and the State Department of Public Health of any employee exposure to COVID-19. The notification must be made within 24 hours of when “the employer knew of or should have reasonably have known of the workplace outbreak.”

If the employer fails to notify or notify within 24 hours, they can be subjected to a misdemeanor infraction carrying a $10,000 fine.

Train Your Workers in COVID-19 Prevention

coronavirus covid-19

As the COVID-19 virus spreads across the world and the number of cases growing in the U.S., there is a lot of hysteria and misinformation about how to protect yourself from this new virus strain.

More and more people are wearing surgical masks when they go outside, thinking it will protect them, and some people have stopped drinking Corona beer because the virus is a coronavirus. This has left plenty of people not sure what they can do to avoid catching it themselves. There are also obvious concerns about workplaces as the virus spreads some employees may be afraid to come to work.

You should consider talking to your staff about how to protect themselves and consider holding a meeting to go over the main points they should follow. To help, we’ve compiled best practices information from the Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization to provide you with unfiltered advice so you can protect yourself and your family:

What should I do to protect myself and others?

The most common way for this disease to spread is from a person touching a surface that has been infected through a sneeze or cough from a carrier. And then the person touches their eye, nose or mouth. That’s all it takes.

  • Be mindful of what you touch all day. If you press elevator or ATM buttons, use a knuckle instead of a fingertip, while on escalators or stairs try to avoid touching the handrail.
  • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth and if you have touched something in public, do not touch your face at any time until you have a chance to wash your hands or use hand sanitizer.
  • When washing, wet your hands with clean water, lather soap on every surface, scrub your hands together for at least 20 seconds, and rinse before drying. Just how long is 20 seconds? Humming the “Happy Birthday” song from beginning to end twice.
  • Clean “high-touch” surfaces (like doorknobs and counters) in your home every day with a solution or half rubbing alcohol and half water.
  • Clean your mobile phone daily. Most people are touching their phones hundreds of times a day, making it ripe for harboring the coronavirus.
  • Stay away from people you know you are sick and stay away from someone who is coughing or sneezing near you.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • If you cough, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash. If none is available, sneeze into your arm or cover it with your hands. Wash your hands as soon as possible after a sneeze.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe. 

Should I wear a mask to protect myself?

Health experts recommend against using a mask. Most people have been using simple surgical masks which do nothing to protect the wearer from airborne viruses expelled through an infected person’s coughs and sneezes. These types of masks are more designed to keep the wearer from spreading whatever they have.

There is one type of mask that is more suitable for protection: The N95 mask, which is named so because it can filter out 95% of airborne particles, but even these are not foolproof and must often be fitted properly to provide the desired protection. The CDC does not recommend wearing an N95 mask if you have not been trained in how to wear it.

Stockpile stuff for your home

Experts suggest stocking at least a 30-day supply of any needed prescriptions, and you should consider doing the same for household items like food staples, laundry detergent, and diapers, if you have small children.

Remember, alcohol is a good disinfectant for coronaviruses so make sure to keep surfaces in your home clean.

What if you get sick?

The WHO recommends that if you feel sick, you should stay home. If you have a fever, cough and difficulty breathing, seek medical attention and call in advance to let them know your symptoms and that you are coming. Follow the directions of your local health authority.

New Rules Require Employers to Provide IIPP upon Request

work safety IIPP

New Cal/OSHA regulations will require employers to provide access to their injury and illness prevention programs upon request.

Under the new rule, which is expected to take effect in April, employers will be required to provide a copy of their IIPP within five days upon an employee’s or an employee’s representative’s (a lawyer’s) request. The employer can provide it in electronic or printed form.

That said, the new rule excludes requests for records of the steps the employer has taken to implement and maintain the IIPP. This was excluded at the behest of employers who raised concerns that allowing such requests would give attorneys a green light to file requests in hopes of discovering errors or “improprieties.”

Despite the current absence of a rule, many employers already provide employees access to the IIPP through the availability of printed and/or electronic copies.

“For employers that do not currently provide such access, they will need to ensure that employees can access a free copy of the IIPP directly or through a designated representative upon request,” Cal/OSHA’s board staff wrote in the “Final Statement of Reasons” for the rulemaking package. “As such, providing access need not be a complex procedure requiring costly development.”

Employer groups had lobbied for a 10-day window for providing the IIPP, while labor groups wanted a faster timeline of just 48 hours. The board compromised with the five-day rule.

The rule was needed because the current IIPP standard does not explicitly state that employees should have access to their company’s IIPP.

Current IIPP standard

Every employer in California is required to have an effective IIPP. This basic safety program for your workplace addresses the hazards your employees face at work each day, and it must be in writing.

Cal/OSHA has a guide for creating an IIPP.

But, you should not just create an IIPP because you have to. Going through the process of creating an IIPP ― as well as updating it periodically ― can also help your organization by:

  • Preventing workplace injuries.
  • Reducing your workers’ compensation insurance rates.
  • Helping you to find ways to boost your workflow.
  • Improving the bottom line of your business.

Elements of an effective IIPP

  • The plan is in writing and reflects what you actually do.
  • A point-person, who is in charge of managing the IIPP process.
  • Input from department heads as well as rank and file employees when updating or creating your IIPP.
  • Requiring that everyone follows the rules of the program.
  • A system for reliable, prompt communication between supervisors and line employees on safety.
  • Conducting regular inspections to identify hazards.
  • A framework for investigating accidents and illnesses, to discover the cause and to prevent recurrence.
  • Requiring that hazards are corrected promptly when found.
  • A regimen for training employees on the hazards they may encounter at work.
  • Documentation of training and workplace inspections.

Employer Guide for Dealing with the Coronavirus

coronavirus

As the outbreak of the 2019 novel coronavirus gains momentum and potentially begins to spread in North America, employers will have to start considering what steps they can take to protect their workers while fulfilling their legal obligations.

Employers are in a difficult position because it is likely that the workplace would be a significant source of transmission among people. And if you have employees in occupations that may be of higher risk of contracting the virus, you could be required to take certain measures to comply with OSHA’s General Duty Clause.

On top of that, if you have workers who come down with the virus, you will need to consider how you’re going to deal with sick leave issues. Additionally, workers who are sick or have a family member who is stricken may ask to take time off under the Family Medical Leave Act.

Coronavirus explained

According to the Centers for Disease Control, the virus is transmitted between humans from coughing, sneezing and touching, and it enters through the eyes, nose and mouth.

Symptoms include a runny nose, a cough, a sore throat, and high temperature. After two to 14 days, patients will develop a dry cough and mild breathing difficulty. Victims also can experience body aching, gastrointestinal distress and diarrhea.

Severe symptoms include a temperature of at least 100.4ºF, pneumonia, and kidney failure.

Employer concerns

OSHA — OSHA’s General Duty Clause requires an employer to protect its employees against “recognized hazards” to safety or health which may cause serious injury or death.

According to an analysis by the law firm Seyfarth Shaw: If OSHA can establish that employees at a worksite are reasonably likely to be “exposed” to the virus  (likely workers such as health care providers, emergency responders, transportation workers), OSHA could require the employer to develop a plan with procedures to protects its employees.

Protected activity — If you have an employee who refuses to work if they believe they are at risk of contracting the coronavirus in the workplace due to the actual presence or probability that it is present there, what do you do?

Under OSHA’s whistleblower statutes, the employee’s refusal to work could be construed as “protected activity,” which prohibits employers from taking adverse action against them for their refusal to work.

Family and Medical Leave Act — Under the FMLA, an employee working for an employer with 50 or more workers is eligible for up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave if they have a serious health condition. The same applies if an employee has a family member who has been stricken by coronavirus and they need to care for them.

The virus would likely qualify as a serious health condition under the FMLA, which would warrant unpaid leave.

What to do

Here’s what health and safety experts are recommending you do now:

  • Consider restricting foreign business trips to affected areas for your employees.
  • Perform medical inquiries to the extent legally permitted.
  • Impose potential quarantines for employees who have traveled to affected areas. Ask them to get a fitness-for-duty note from their doctor before returning to work.
  • Educate your staff about how to reduce the chances of them contracting the virus, as well as what to do if they suspect they have caught it.

If you have an employee you suspect has caught the virus, experts recommend that you:

  • Advise them to stay home until symptoms have run their course.
  • Advise them to seek out medical care.
  • Make sure they avoid contact with others.
  • Contact the CDC and local health department immediately.
  • Contact a hazmat company to clean and disinfect the workplace.
  • Grant leaves of absence and work from home options for anyone who has come down with the coronavirus.

If there is a massive outbreak in society, consider whether or not to continue operating. If you plan to continue, put a plan in place. You may want to:

  • Set a plan ahead of time for how to continue operations.
  • Assess your staffing needs in case of a pandemic.
  • Consider alternative work sites or allowing staff to work from home.
  • Stay in touch with vendors and suppliers to see how they are coping.
  • Consider seeking out alternative vendors should yours suddenly be unable to work.

Car Crashes a Leading Cause of High-severity Claims

safe driving

Traffic accidents continue to be one of the leading causes of high-severity workers’ comp claims, according to research.

The National Council on Compensation Insurance found in a study that the cost of workers’ comp claims for accidents involving motor vehicles was 250% more than the average for all workplace accidents.

The study also found large differences between the cost of claims involving large trucks and passenger cars, as well as a reduction in the number of accidents during economic recessions. Besides a threat to other drivers on the road, any injuries your employees suffer while on driving for you on the job will end up being paid for by your workers’ comp policy as well any time missed from work due to the injury.

The study found:

  • While the frequency of truck fatalities is now very similar to the frequency of passenger vehicle fatalities, the frequency of non-fatal injuries is higher for passenger vehicles.
  • Motor vehicle accidents are more likely to result in multiple claims, and claims costs are higher for claims from multiple-claim events.
  • Motor vehicle accident claims are more severe than the average workers’ compensation claim.
  • Vehicle accidents affect a wide range of occupations other than just truckers.
  • Neck injuries are among the top diagnoses.
  • The duration of motor vehicle accident workers’ comp claims is more than a third longer than the average claim.
  • There is a significant amount of subrogation in workers’ comp traffic accident claims, with such claims accounting for more than half of all claims with subrogation.
  • Motor vehicle claims are three times as likely to involve a claimant attorney compared with other claims.
  • Distracted driving continues to be a leading cause of accidents and close calls.

Safe-driving rules for your staff

Encourage your employees to drive safely and abide by the safety rules you establish.

A good set of rules, drawn up by OSHA and which should be in writing for your employees, is:

  • Wear a seat belt at all times – driver and passenger(s).
  • Be well-rested before driving.
  • Avoid taking medications that make you drowsy.
  • Set a realistic goal for the number of miles that you can drive safely each day.
  • Do not use a cell phone while driving, unless you are wearing a hands-free device. Do not send text messages.
  • Avoid distractions, such as adjusting the radio or other controls, eating or drinking.
  • Continually search the roadway to be alert to situations requiring quick action.
  • Stop about every two hours for a break. Get out of the vehicle to stretch, take a walk, and get refreshed.
  • Keep your cool in traffic!
  • Be patient and courteous to other drivers.
  • Do not take other drivers’ actions personally.
  • Reduce your stress by planning your route ahead of time (bring maps and directions), allowing plenty of travel time, and avoiding crowded roadways and busy driving times.