Car Crashes a Leading Cause of High-severity Claims

safe driving

Traffic accidents continue to be one of the leading causes of high-severity workers’ comp claims, according to research.

The National Council on Compensation Insurance found in a study that the cost of workers’ comp claims for accidents involving motor vehicles was 250% more than the average for all workplace accidents.

The study also found large differences between the cost of claims involving large trucks and passenger cars, as well as a reduction in the number of accidents during economic recessions. Besides a threat to other drivers on the road, any injuries your employees suffer while on driving for you on the job will end up being paid for by your workers’ comp policy as well any time missed from work due to the injury.

The study found:

  • While the frequency of truck fatalities is now very similar to the frequency of passenger vehicle fatalities, the frequency of non-fatal injuries is higher for passenger vehicles.
  • Motor vehicle accidents are more likely to result in multiple claims, and claims costs are higher for claims from multiple-claim events.
  • Motor vehicle accident claims are more severe than the average workers’ compensation claim.
  • Vehicle accidents affect a wide range of occupations other than just truckers.
  • Neck injuries are among the top diagnoses.
  • The duration of motor vehicle accident workers’ comp claims is more than a third longer than the average claim.
  • There is a significant amount of subrogation in workers’ comp traffic accident claims, with such claims accounting for more than half of all claims with subrogation.
  • Motor vehicle claims are three times as likely to involve a claimant attorney compared with other claims.
  • Distracted driving continues to be a leading cause of accidents and close calls.

Safe-driving rules for your staff

Encourage your employees to drive safely and abide by the safety rules you establish.

A good set of rules, drawn up by OSHA and which should be in writing for your employees, is:

  • Wear a seat belt at all times – driver and passenger(s).
  • Be well-rested before driving.
  • Avoid taking medications that make you drowsy.
  • Set a realistic goal for the number of miles that you can drive safely each day.
  • Do not use a cell phone while driving, unless you are wearing a hands-free device. Do not send text messages.
  • Avoid distractions, such as adjusting the radio or other controls, eating or drinking.
  • Continually search the roadway to be alert to situations requiring quick action.
  • Stop about every two hours for a break. Get out of the vehicle to stretch, take a walk, and get refreshed.
  • Keep your cool in traffic!
  • Be patient and courteous to other drivers.
  • Do not take other drivers’ actions personally.
  • Reduce your stress by planning your route ahead of time (bring maps and directions), allowing plenty of travel time, and avoiding crowded roadways and busy driving times.

More Employers Get Premium Bills for ‘Misclassified’ Workers

contractor

One outgrowth of a new California law that applies more stringent criteria for what constitutes an independent contractor is that many employers are likely to see more audits and calls for additional premium from their workers’ comp insurers.

In fact, it’s already happening in some industries, according to the insurance industry trade press. More and more employers are being hit with sizeable surprise bills for additional premium by their insurers for allegedly misclassifying independent contractors as employees, according to one article in the Workers’ Comp Executive trade publication.

And this problem is only like to get worse in 2020 as the full effects of this year’s landmark independent contractor law, AB 5, take hold.

What’s happening now

The Workers’ Comp Executive reported that the California Department of Insurance’s administrative hearings bureau is receiving an increasing amount of complaints from employers that are disputing their workers’ comp insurers’ request for additional premium for workers that had originally been classified as independent contractors.

The publication cited the case of a construction company that State Compensation Insurance Fund says misclassified 42 individuals who worked for the company as independent contractors in 2017 and hence should pay an additional $114,000 in premium for that year. The dispute is currently in front of the administrative hearings bureau.

In 2018, the California Supreme Court handed down a game-changing decision in the case of Dynamex Operations West, Inc. vs. Superior Court, in which it rejected a test that’s been used for more than a decade to decide who qualifies as an employee or independent contractor.

The court instead said that California employers must answer ‘yes’ to the following three questions if they want to classify a worker as an independent contractor:

  • The worker is free from the control and direction of the hirer in relation to the performance of the work, both under the contract and in fact;
  • The worker performs work that is outside the usual course of the hirer’s business; and
  • The worker is customarily engaged in an independently established trade, occupation or business of the same nature as the work performed for the hirer.

The impact of AB 5

In 2019, Assembly Bill 5, which essentially codifies the Dynamex decision into state law, was signed into law ― and it will take effect Jan. 1, 2020. But while the Dynamex decision specifically excluded the independent contractor test from use in applying workers’ comp premiums, AB 5 does not. The new law will apply to workers’ comp on or after July 1, 2020.

The law is not retroactive, however, so insurers should not be able to apply the new test for workers’ comp premium assessment purposes for policies that took effect before July 1.

Industry observers say they expect more California employers to receive additional premium calls from their workers’ comp carriers after the law takes effect. The law will have the most significant workers’ comp implications on industries including construction, real estate, professional services and fitness, which often have many workers classified as independent contractors.

Your workers’ comp insurer will not send you a demand for additional premium without conducting an audit of your payroll. If the insurance company deems any independent contractors that you use as employees, then it will calculate the amount of back premium it thinks you owe for them.

For employers who think the insurance company erred, they can usually challenge the decision with the insurer. However, if that fails, businesses have a second opportunity: to file a complaint with the Department of Insurance.

CALIFORNIA: Bureau Recommends Workers’ Comp Rates Drop 5.4%

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Workers’ compensation insurance rates will likely continue sliding in 2020 after California’s rating agency submitted its recommendation that the state insurance commissioner reduce the average benchmark rates by 5.4%.

If the recommendation is approved, it will be the ninth consecutive rate decrease since 2015 (some years had two decreases), which have resulted in the average benchmark rate for all of California’s class codes falling a combined 45% since then.

The Workers’ Compensation Insurance Rating Bureau, which made the filing, said that average claims costs continue falling due to the effects of reforms that took effect in 2014. Rates are still declining because:

  • Claims cost development continues falling.
  • Claims are being settled more quickly.
  • Average pharmaceutical costs continue falling sharply.
  • The number of liens on claims continues dropping.

Offsetting those positive trends are:

  • Increases in cumulative trauma claims (particularly in Southern California).
  • Rising individual claim costs.
  • The cost of adjusting claims is increasing.

The Rating Bureau tracks workers’ comp costs in the state and makes the recommendations for changing the benchmark rates, which insurers use to price their policies. Every class code gets its own rate, which will change depending on the trends in claims costs and numbers for that class code.

Insurers use the benchmark rates as guideposts for pricing their own policies, but in the end, they can price the policies as they wish.

After using the benchmark rate, insurers will add surcharges for various classes or regions, and add on administrative costs to arrive at their own rates. Also, rates will not fall for all employers.

Rates depend on a number of factors, including an employer’s claims history and region. Policies in Southern California, for instance, are often surcharged because of the amount of cumulative trauma claims filed in the region.

The Rating Bureau will review accident-year experience valued as of June 30 once it has the figures, and it could amend the rate filing later. The state insurance commissioner will hold a hearing on the rate filing in September or October, and then make a final decision on the rate change.

What to do

Just because rates have been falling, employers should not waver in their focus on safety.

Here are some mistakes to avoid:

Becoming complacent – Falling rates act as blinders for many employers. When the cost of your workers’ comp policy continues declining, it’s easy to shift focus away from workplace safety, injury management and cost containment to other business matters. This is a mistake and can cost you in additional workplace injuries.

Focusing on just workers’ comp premiums – Premiums are only part of the cost of workplace injuries. Indirect costs – including overtime, temporary labor, increased training, supervisor time, production delays, unhappy customers, increased stress, and property or equipment damage – represent several times the direct cost of the injury.

Expecting rates to stay low forever – Workers’ comp rates always follow a cycle of increases and decreases. As rates fall, employers reap the benefits in lower costs, but their attention to workplace safety may wither and then overall claims numbers and costs start increasing and/or reforms erode, starting a cycle of increasing rates. The key is to ride the low rates for as long as you can through unwavering attention to workplace safety and claims management.

Chasing low rates – One benefit you have from working with us is continuity, and jumping ship to another broker just to save a few thousand dollars on your premium is not always a smart choice, particularly if the new brokerage is not involved in helping you keep claims costs low.

Why Workers’ Comp Claims Spike in the Summer

Construction Site

Workplace injury rates rise during the summer months. When summer rolls around, companies in many sectors, including agriculture and construction, significantly increase production.

Increased road construction raises risks for workers and drivers. Many of the newly hired workers are young and inexperienced, creating a high potential for workplace injuries.

Toiling in the sun is also a leading cause of weather-related injuries, including heatstroke, heat cramps and heat exhaustion. Heat illnesses occur when the body overheats to the point it cannot cool off, even with profuse sweating.

Young workers

Too often, young workers enter the workforce with little or no on-the-job safety training, heightening safety risks.

Recently, the Washington State Department of Labor & Industries released a report showing that teens are twice as likely to be hurt on the job as adults.

In Washington state, a total of 547 youths aged 17 and under were injured in the workplace in 2014, up nearly 14.7% over the previous year. Of the total, 173 were in the food and hospitality industries. The next largest total, 80, was reported in both the retail trades and agriculture.

Falls to the floor increased 77%, to 55 cases, as the chief cause of injury.

Young workers, aged 14 to 24, have more accidents because they lack the knowledge, training, and experience to prevent them. Some common issues employers encounter with young workers are:

  • They do not understand what can go wrong.
  • They do not always follow the rules.
  • They fail to use personal protective equipment (PPE) or use it incorrectly.
  • They horse around on the equipment.
  • They do not ask questions.
  • They think they are infallible.

It’s also important for supervisors to recognize the physical, cognitive and emotional developmental differences between young and adult workers. It takes extra effort to train and supervise seasonal employees on working safely.

Here are some training suggestions:

  • Repeatedly demonstrate job procedures and safety precautions. Don’t overlook the basics, such as starting and stopping equipment.
  • The step-by-step instructions for any task must include the task’s hazards and how to avoid them. Take the time to clearly explain the risks of not following the proper steps. Use examples.
  • Explain when and how to use PPE, as well as where to get it, how to inspect it, and how to remove and store it properly.
  • Train one-to-one with young workers and observe them performing tasks.
  • Encourage them to report problems and to ask questions.
  • Assign specific clean-up tasks and emphasize the importance of a clean, clutter-free worksite.
  • Control the hours worked. Many popular summer jobs, such as construction workers, landscapers, and jobs in hospitality and food industries, require long hours of work in the heat that can lead to fatigue, inattention, and stress, increasing the likelihood of injury.
  • Provide a mentor.
  • Demonstrate that safety is a priority at your facility. Words aren’t enough. New workers also need to see actions that reinforce the message: clean worksite, properly labeled hazardous substances and readily accessible safety data sheets, workers wearing required PPE and who are concerned about workplace safety and show it, and so on.

Heat illness dangers

While there are many excellent resources on dealing with heat, it’s important for employers to recognize that there are individual differences among workers and those who are struggling may be hesitant to complain.

The American Society of Safety Engineers calls heat the “unseen danger” at construction sites because the symptoms of heat illness can be subtle and misinterpreted as mere annoyances rather than signs of a serious health issue.

Workers new to outdoor jobs are particularly vulnerable. Implementing an acclimatization program, providing adequate water and frequent breaks are all critical, but the best way for employers to prevent heat illnesses is to consistently interact with workers to gauge how they’re feeling and provide current information on weather conditions.

Also, using apps, such as OSHA’s Heat Safety Tool, is a good way for workers to monitor their risk levels.

Workers’ Comp Audit Mistakes: What to Look For

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No company owner wants to undergo a workers’ compensation audit, but they are a fact of life if you run a business and have employees.

Unfortunately, many audits don’t go smoothly and sometimes your insurer may make mistakes. Missouri-based Workers’ Compensation Consultants, which helps employers through the workers’ comp audit process, recently listed the 10 most common audit mistakes that insurance companies make.

The list highlights a common problem and how you can detect the mistakes to avoid being stuck with a massive audit bill. Insurance companies allow you to review the audit with your broker. If you notice that you have received an audit bill that is obviously overstated, you should contact us.

Here are the things to look for when reviewing an audit by your insurance company:

Wrong class code – Misapplication of job classifications occurs in many workers’ comp audits. With hundreds of job classes to choose from, mistakes can happen. Talk to us and review your old policies to see if any of your class codes have changed.

X-Mod is changed – After your insurer finishes the audit, it will use the information to calculate your premium. When that happens, it has to include your X-Mod to get the right rate. But sometimes the insurer may use an incorrect X-Mod. Check carefully.

Subcontractors are counted – Sometimes insurers will include subcontractors as employees, which results in a new audit bill to account for the additional “employees.” But if they are genuine subcontractors, they should not be counted. Often, uninsured contractors will be included as employees. Make sure to use insured contractors only.

Disappearing credits – Most policies will have some sort of premium credits or other modifiers. Sometimes during audits, the insurer will remove them when recalculating the premium they think you owe. Watch out for missing credits and other modifiers if you get an audit bill, like:

  • Premium discount
  • Schedule credits
  • Deductible credits
  • State-specific credits

 

Audit worksheets missing – If the auditor fails to provide you with audit worksheets, which are used do compile your payroll and other audit information, you should ask to check their work. They will provide you with the information you need to carry out such a check.

Your rates changed – The rates you are charged at the beginning of your policy period must remain the same for the entire policy period. If your base rates have changed, the insurer may have made a mistake. 

Separation of payroll – Depending on your industry, you may or may not be able to split your employees’ payroll between job classifications (like cabinet installers and sheetrock hangers). This is a pinch point when errors can occur. If the auditor says you are not allowed to split job classifications even though you have in the past, your audit may be in error.

Unexpected large premium due – If you get a significant bill for your insurance company after your audit, the auditor may have made mistakes, particularly if you know that your employment has remained relatively stable and you’ve had no significant claims, if any. If it seems out of whack, call us.

Payroll data doesn’t match – If there is a discrepancy between your payroll data and what you see on the audit, a mistake may have been made. Try to match the payroll on the audit with that generated from your accountant. If the insurer made a mistake, you could end up paying for phantom payroll numbers.

No physical audit – There are three types of audits:

  • Mail audit
  • Phone audit, and
  • Physical audit

 

The mail and phone audits are prone to errors, since neither you nor your staff likely have any experience in premium auditing. If you have a big bill after a mail or phone audit, mistakes could have been made.

As Health Deductibles Rise, Employees More Likely to File Workers’ Comp Claims: Study

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Sometimes, injured employees are afraid to file a workers’ comp claim after being injured at work because they fear the specter of retaliation by their employer.

Experts suspect that up to 10% of workplace injuries are never reported because the workers choose to have the injuries covered by their employer-sponsored health plans. Most employers may not be aware of the full extent of their workplace injuries because of this phenomenon.

But, that could change as workers are saddled with higher deductibles and out-of-pocket expenses, according to a new study.

A number of past studies have found that if the costs to workers for having their personal health insurance cover a workplace injury is less than the “cost” to them of filing a workers’ comp claim, they will opt to have their health insurance cover it instead.

Here’s what studies have found over the years:

  • A 1996 study found that workers without health insurance have an incentive to claim their medical issues are work-related even if they are not, so that workers’ compensation insurance will pay for care. The study also found that if the injury occurs at work, health insurance may deter workers from filing for workers’ comp if they feel there is a cost to filing a claim.
  • A 2007 study found that a genuine workers’ comp claim can be “costly” to file for a worker if:
    • The employer dissuades workers from filing workers’ comp claims because they fear the claims will increase their premiums.
    • The injured worker does not want to deal with the paperwork for a workers’ comp claim.
    • The individual feels there is a stigma associated with filing for workers’ comp.
  • A 2003 study of Michigan workers and their physicians found that 70% of injured workers did not file for workers’ comp, and that 36% of the non-reporting injured workers cited having health insurance as a reason they did not.

What could be ahead

The most recent study, by the Workers’ Compensation Research Institute (WCRI), found that injured employees are more likely to file workers’ compensation claims when they have high-deductible group health plans.

The study found that workers with a remaining group health insurance deductible that exceeds $550 are more likely to file workers’ comp claims than if the deductible were less. As more workers find themselves staring at higher health insurance deductibles, they will properly report their workers’ comp claims to their employers.

“In years past, workers may have chosen to have a work injury covered within their group health plan,” John Ruser, WCRI president and CEO, said in a statement. “But the increasing cost of deductibles may cause them to consider having the injury covered ─ where it potentially belongs ─ in the workers’ compensation system, where there are no deductibles or copayments for the medical care they receive.”

This is likely to add about 5% more claims into the system, the WCRI found.

What you can do

There are risks to both your employee and your organization if a worker does not report their workplace injury.

Urge your workers to report any workplace injuries so that you can have them properly treated. If a worker decides to not report the claim and they have their health insurance pay for it, problems can take root and cause major issues for you later:

  • Your insurer loses the chance to direct the initial treatment to an occupational health clinic that specializes in treating workers’ compensation injuries and coordinates with the employer’s return-to-work program.
  • A delay in seeking treatment may cause a deterioration in the employee’s condition that will impede their recovery time.
  • It impedes the insurance company’s ability to investigate a claim, determine compensability and identify claims fraud.

New Rule Simplifies X-Mod Calculation, Encourages Reporting First Aid Claims

A new method for calculating workers’ compensation experience modifications (X-Mods) took effect in California on Jan. 1.

The Workers’ Compensation Insurance Rating Bureau of California has created a new simplified formula for calculating X-Mods as part of its efforts to add more transparency to the process. The new formula excludes the first $250 of every claim for the X-Mod computation, no matter how large or small the claim is.

This also means that if an employer pays, say, $200 for first aid on a minor workplace injury, they are required to report it as a claim. Doing so will not affect their X-Mod in any way, no matter how many first aid claims they have.

The goal is to encourage employers to report all claims, even those that may require minimal medical treatment or first aid.

Examples:

  • If you have a $10,000 primary threshold and you have a claim that ends up costing $6,000, the amount used to compute your X-Mod would be $5,750.
  • If you have a $10,000 primary threshold and you have a claim that ends up costing $17,000, the amount used for calculating your X-Mod would be $9,750.
  • If you have a claim that’s valued at $250 or less, the claim will still show on your experience rating worksheet, but it will not be used at all when calculating your X-Mod.

Does this affect your current X-Mod?

Yes. Any claim incurred against policies incepting during the experience period for your 2019 experience modification, which includes 2015, 2016 and 2017 policy years, will be used in the X-Mod computation at $250 less than its reported value.

Claims costing $250 or less will be shown on worksheets, but will not be used in X-Mod calculation.

Reporting first aid claims is required

Workers’ comp regulations require that all claims that cost some amount of money to treat must be reported to your workers’ comp carrier, which in turn must report to the Rating Bureau so that it can accurately keep workers’ comp records on employers that are experience rated.

The rules have already been on the books for years, but the problem of non-reporting became too great, so the Rating Bureau has stepped up to encourage employers to follow the rules. And in this case, it can’t work against you.

The Health of Your Drivers May Be Hurting Your Business

Semi Truck Preparing to Drive

Most goods in the U.S. are delivered by truck. Trucking companies, businesses that deliver their own product and their customers rely on well-functioning vehicles and drivers for the success of their operations.

Too often, though, driving a truck is not conducive to good health. That can spell trouble for the drivers and for the profitability of their employers.

There are a number of factors about the truck-driving occupation that contribute to poor physical health, including:

  • Drivers are hired to sit all day behind the wheel, with limited opportunities for exercise.
  • They eat at truck stops and other restaurants where they can get meals quickly, contributing to poor diets.
  • Their work schedules are not consistent, interfering with sleep patterns.
  • The job is stressful. They have to contend with the annoyances and hazards of the road all day long, including traffic delays, dangerous drivers, and poor weather. On top of that, they are under pressure to reach their destinations on time. This gives them incentives to skip on sleep and ingest stimulants to help them stay awake.

Not surprisingly, studies have found that:

  • The obesity rate for truck drivers is double that of the general population.
  • Their smoking rate is almost triple that of the general population.
  • 88% of truck drivers report having hypertension, smoking or obesity, and 9% reported having all three, quadruple the general population’s rate.
  • Truck drivers’ life expectancy is 16 years less than the national average.
  • Unhealthy drivers do not perform their jobs as well as healthy ones do.
  • Among private sector employees, truck drivers have the highest number of illnesses and injuries that cause them to miss work.

A 2017 study found that drivers with three or more serious health conditions like the ones mentioned above are two to four times more likely to have an accident than are those with only one.

One common affliction for many drivers is sleep apnea. Drivers who have untreated sleep apnea are five times more likely to have a preventable accident than are those who treat it.

What you can do

What can you as an employer do to maintain a healthy driving force? Plenty.

  • During the pre-employment screening process, evaluate candidates’ fitness levels through physical examinations and a review of their driving histories.
  • Review employer safety policies and driver wellness and fitness requirements during new employee orientation.
  • Implement injury prevention programs.
  • Offer free or discounted memberships at gyms with locations around the country.
  • Encourage drivers to take quick exercise breaks during trips.
  • Encourage healthy eating both at home and on the road.
  • Monitor drivers’ performance through data provided by telematics devices installed in trucks, review of accident reports, and in-person observation of drivers.

The takeaway

If a truck driver suffers a heart attack or dozes off while hauling a load weighing tens of thousands of pounds, the results can be catastrophic. In addition to the lives lost or forever changed, the cost to the employer could be millions of dollars in jury awards.

Making driver wellness a priority is the right thing to do, but it also makes business sense for employers.

Do You Have an Emergency Action Plan?

Evacuation plan macro

How would you escape from your workplace in an emergency? Do you know where all the exits are in case your first choice is too crowded? Are you sure the doors will be unlocked and the exit access, such as a hallway, will not be blocked during a fire, explosion or other crisis?

Knowing the answers to these questions could keep you safe during an emergency. And the answers should be readily available to all of your staff in your organization’s emergency action plan (EAP).

Almost every business is required under Occupational Safety and Health Administration standards to have an EAP. The purpose these plans is to facilitate and organize employer and employee actions during workplace emergencies.

Well-developed emergency plans and proper employee training (that helps workers understand their roles and responsibilities when executing the plan) will result in fewer and less severe employee injuries and less structural damage to the facility during emergencies.

A poorly prepared plan likely will lead to a disorganized evacuation or emergency response, resulting in confusion, injury and property damage.

Putting together a comprehensive EAP that deals with issues specific to your worksite is not difficult. It involves taking what you learn from conducting a workplace evaluation and describing how employees will respond to different types of emergencies, taking into account your worksite layout, structural features and emergency systems.

If you have 10 or fewer employees, you may communicate your plan orally. For firms with more than 10 employees, the plan must be written, kept in the workplace and available for employee review.

Although employers are required to have an EAP only when the applicable OSHA standard requires it, OSHA strongly recommends that all employers have an EAP.

Important elements

A few of the important elements of an EAP include:

  • Procedures for reporting fires and other emergencies.
  • Procedures for emergency evacuation, including the type of evacuation and exit route assignments.
  • Procedures for employees who stay behind to continue critical plant operations.
  • Procedures to account for all employees after evacuation.
  • Names or titles of employees to contact for detailed plan information.
  • Alarm system to alert workers.

In addition, designate and train employees to assist in a safe and orderly evacuation of other employees.

Review the EAP with each employee covered when:

  • The plan is developed or an employee is assigned to a new job,
  • Employees’ responsibilities under the plan change, or
  • You change the EAP.

New OSHA Deadline for Fall Protection

Slips, trips and falls are some of the leading causes of workplace injuries. They account for 20% of all workplace fatalities, disabling injuries and days away from work in general industry.

The injuries and risks are so common that four of the top 10 most cited standards by OSHA are related to fall prevention.

With that in mind, you should be aware of changes to OSHA regulations that take effect Nov. 19, 2018. The changes are part of a larger rewriting of the general industry walking-working surfaces standards that took effect in 2017.

Specifically, those rewritten standards:

  • Clarified definitions
  • Eliminated overly specific application conditions
  • Better organized the requirements
  • Simplified general requirements
  • Aligned more closely with the construction standard, and
  • Gave flexibility to use personal fall protection systems in lieu of guardrail systems.

The fixed ladders provision

That said, one area that was left for later implementation was standards for fixed ladders.

Under the revised standard, cages or wells for fall protection on fixed ladders higher than 24 feet are no longer acceptable. However, there are grandfather provisions and a phase-in period for the new provisions:

  • Fixed ladder systems installed before November 19, 2018 must have a cage, well, ladder safety system or personal fall arrest system
  • Fixed ladder systems installed on or after November 19, 2018 must be equipped with a personal fall arrest system or ladder safety system (cages or wells for fall protection are no longer acceptable).
  • When any portion of a fixed ladder is replaced, the replacement must be equipped with a ladder safety or personal fall arrest system.

What’s happening on the ground

OSHA continues to take the risks of slips, trips and falls seriously and continues to focus on some of the most overlooked areas that can contribute to these incidents. The most cited citations in OSHA’s 2017 fiscal year, which ended Sept. 30, 2017, were for general requirements violations, including housekeeping violations (291 citations), followed by 122 citations for clean and dry floors and 53 citations for walkways free from hazards.

The second-most common citation was for failure to protect against fall hazards along unprotected sides or edges that are at least four feet above a lower level, including:

  • 205 citations for unprotected sides and edges
  • 55 citations for fall protection stairways
  • 49 citations for falls – holes
  • 26 citations for falls around dangerous equipment

The takeaway

OSHA continues to police slip, trip and fall violations with gusto. Based on the statistics, you should make sure to keep work areas and floors clear of obstructions and slip and fall risks.

You should also make sure you have protections in place to avoid any unprotected sides and edges.